stoop

stoop
stoop
{vb Stoop, condescend, deign can mean to descend below the level (as in rank or dignity) where one belongs or thinks he belongs to do something.
Stoop implies a descent not only in rank or dignity but also, and more often, from a relatively high moral plane to a lower one; the term, therefore, can suggest disgraceful or shameful action>>
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stoop to fraud

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to think that you should stoop to lying

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Often the term implies a lowering of one's standards (as of conduct) or a debasement of one's principles for some unworthy end (as to satisfy greed or ambition)
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aspiring to be the leader of a nation of third-rate men, he had to stoop to the common level— Mencken

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his ambition was still to paint huge historical pictures; but meanwhile, to keep the pot boiling, he was prepared to stoop to a pettier kind of art— Huxley

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but on the material side, Mr. Archer, if one may stoop to consider such things— Wharton

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Condescend may imply the stooping of one who is actually exalted in power, rank, or dignity so as to accommodate himself to intercourse with those who are his inferiors; in this sense the term usually suggests graciousness and courtesy and a waiving of formalities
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Spain's mighty monarch, in gracious clemency, does condescend, on these conditions, to become your friend— Dryden

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Often, however, the term implies an assumption of superiority and a patronizing manner that tends to offend or affront the person who is regarded as an inferior
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no beggar ever felt him condescend, no prince presume— J. R. Lowell

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those who thought they were honoring me by condescending to address a few words to me—F. W. Robinson

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he had, of course, every right to condescend. He was the success, the young man of twenty-three with a hit on Broadway— Wouk

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Deign implies a temperament or frame of mind that makes one haughty, arrogant, or contemptuous more often than it implies high rank or dignity or high standards of conduct; it usually means to stoop to what one believes is not fully in keeping with one's dignity or to something that one is reluctant to do or say or offer; therefore the term is most common with scarcely, hardly, or in negative constructions
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[the] very dog will hardly deign to bark at you— Arnold

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my father she deigned to talk with because he was a simple and friendly man and vaguely a relation— Bromfield

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never deigned to make money in any considerable amount; but he has no doubt that he could do so if he tried— Gorer

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Analogous words: *abase, demean, humble: vouchsafe, accord, *grant, concede: favor, accommodate, *oblige

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • stoop´er — stoop 1 «stoop», verb, noun. –v.i. 1. to bend forward: »He stooped to pick up the money. She stoops over her work. 2. to carry the head and shoulders bent forward: »The old man stoops. 3. (of trees, precipices, or other natural outgrowths) to… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Stoop — Stoop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stooped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stooping}.] [OE. stoupen; akin to AS. st?pian, OD. stuypen, Icel. st[=u]pa, Sw. stupa to fall, to tilt. Cf 5th {Steep}.] 1. To bend the upper part of the body downward and forward; to bend or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stoop to — (something) to do something that makes your moral standards lower. They have stooped to using threats of violence in order to get their way. Usage notes: often used in the forms stoop to someone s level or stoop to the level of dong something:… …   New idioms dictionary

  • Stoop — Stoop, n. [OE. stope, Icel. staup; akin to AS. ste[ a]p, D. stoop, G. stauf, OHG. stouph.] A vessel of liquor; a flagon. [Written also {stoup}.] [1913 Webster] Fetch me a stoop of liquor. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stoop — Stoop, v. t. 1. To bend forward and downward; to bow down; as, to stoop the body. Have stooped my neck. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to incline downward; to slant; as, to stoop a cask of liquor. [1913 Webster] 3. To cause to submit; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stoop — may refer to:* Adrian Stoop (1883 1957), English naturalised rugby union player * Urban stoop, a small staircase or porch * to bend over forward, such as to pick something up * a mild form of kyphosis * the high speed attack dive of a bird of… …   Wikipedia

  • Stoop — Stoop, n. 1. The act of stooping, or bending the body forward; inclination forward; also, an habitual bend of the back and shoulders. [1913 Webster] 2. Descent, as from dignity or superiority; condescension; an act or position of humiliation.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stoop — ist der Name folgender Personen: Dé Stoop (1919–2007), niederländischer Unternehmer und Sportmanager Lukas Stoop (* 1990), schweizer Eishockeyspieler Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demsel …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • stoop — [n] slouched posture droop, round shoulders, sag, slouch, slump; concept 757 Ant. straightening stoop [v1] bow down be bowed, bend, be servile, bow, cringe, crouch, descend, dip, duck, hunch, incline, kneel, lean, relax, sink, slant, squat;… …   New thesaurus

  • Stoop — Stoop, n. [Cf. Icel. staup a knobby lump.] A post fixed in the earth. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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